Sri Lanka's Tragedy and the Global Health Burden of Trauma | Psychology Today

Yesterday, a series of bombings in Sri Lanka killed over 200 people and injured hundreds more, in what police have called coordinated terrorist attacks. While the attacks may be over, their health consequences have only begun. In addition to physical injuries, the survivors of the bombings will be at risk of a range of mental health challenges, from depression to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). They are, sadly, not alone in experiencing this risk. The drivers of trauma are all around us—from natural disasters, to gun violence, to racism, homophobia, and the many forms of interpersonal abuse. The bombings are just the latest reminder that trauma is a ubiquitous human experience that touches millions daily and should be of concern to public health.

The ACA Debate Shows We Need to Change How We Talk About Health | Dean's Note

The Trump administration is once more trying to kill the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In a recent federal appeals court filing, the Justice Department said it concurred with a federal judge in Texas, who ruled to strike down the ACA after deeming it unconstitutional.

This comes almost two years after the administration pushed to repeal the law and replace it with a plan that would have stripped health coverage from millions of Americans. The administration has never stopped trying to undermine the ACA. It has consistently chipped away at it by attempting to undermine its provisions and resisting efforts to expand the law’s reach. Yet this new attempt to undo the law through the courts is arguably its most direct challenge to the ACA’s existence since the GOP-led Senate failed to repeal the law in a dramatic, middle-of-the-night vote.

The Public's Health: A Party Trick | Public Health Post

Here’s a game you can play. At your next dinner party or discussion with friends at a bar, start a conversation about how to make Americans healthier. You can talk about anything you wish: the fact that health in America is getting worse, that the opioid epidemic has led to a life expectancy decline, or that firearms are a health problem. When you start the conversation, start a timer.
 
The object of the game: to see how long it takes for someone in the conversation to use the word “healthcare” interchangeably with health.
 
We have played this game many times and are confident in saying that the end of the game will come within 5 minutes. It never takes longer for some to inadvertently say “healthcare” when they mean “health.” 

Let's Move Beyond The Political Fight Over Health Care To Address The Forces That Shape Health | Cognoscenti

The Trump administration is once more trying to kill the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In a recent federal appeals court filing, the Justice Department said it concurred with a federal judge in Texas, who ruled to strike down the ACA after deeming it unconstitutional.

This comes almost two years after the administration pushed to repeal the law and replace it with a plan that would have stripped health coverage from millions of Americans. The administration has never stopped trying to undermine the ACA. It has consistently chipped away at it by attempting to undermine its provisions and resisting efforts to expand the law’s reach. Yet this new attempt to undo the law through the courts is arguably its most direct challenge to the ACA’s existence since the GOP-led Senate failed to repeal the law in a dramatic, middle-of-the-night vote.

The Public's Health: The Story We Are Not Talking About Enough | Public Health Post

In 1918, a pandemic of Spanish flu infected approximately one third of the global population, killing between 20 and 50 million people. In the United States alone, more than 650,000 people died, enough to contribute to a decline in the country’s life expectancy. For a century, this was the worst decline in American health. Until this year. The National Center for Health Statistics reported that, between 2016 and 2017, US life expectancy dropped from 78.7 to 78.6 years. This marks the third consecutive year that life expectancy in the US has decreased.
 
We have not had a drop like this since the 1918 flu pandemic. What does our lack of attention tell us about how we think about health in this country?

A Wall from Mexico to New Zealand | Fortune

On March 15, a gunman killed 50 people, and injured dozens more, at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand. The attack, which was the deadliest in the country’s recent history, was made even more horrible by happening near the time of Friday Prayer, one of the central rituals of Islam. While the investigation into the shooting is still ongoing, the alleged shooter reportedly wrote a manifesto espousing anti-immigrant, anti-Muslim, and white supremacist beliefs.

That same day, in the US, President Donald Trump continued his efforts to build a wall between the US and Mexico, vetoing a Congressional resolution that would have blocked his declaration of a national emergency along the southern border. Such a wall would fulfil his often-stated campaign promise to reject immigrants who ostensibly threaten the country’s “security,” immigrants about whom the President has spoken in disparaging terms, using an expletiveto refer to countries with predominantly nonwhite populations and callingundocumented immigrants “animals.”

Mental Health Should Matter as Much as Physical Health | Psychology Today

Over the last year, we have seen high profile suicides that have gripped our attention—from Kate Spade, to Anthony Bourdain, to, most recently, the tragic death of Parkland shooting survivor Sydney Aiello. It is often recognized, correctly, that suicide is highly linked to mental illness, particularly depression. That, in and of itself, is ample reason for us to think carefully about mental illness and its consequences, but before I tackle the issue of suicide, I want to comment, more foundationally, on why mental health should matter, and be more central to our attention in health. 

The Public's Health: We Cannot Have it All | Public Health Post

Imagine for a minute that you are the health commissioner responsible for a town of 100,000 people. The mayor calls you into her office and reminds you that one of her campaign promises was to improve the flu vaccination rate in the town. The previous season, 45% of the town’s residents received the vaccine. This season she wants the vaccination rate to hit 65%. That all sounds reasonable, and with your team you develop a strategy that communicates primarily through doctors’ offices the importance of flu vaccinations. You develop written material and some videos and you make sure that all patients see them prominently displayed. The strategy works. At the end of this year’s flu season, you have vaccinated 65% of everyone in town.